AllerJeez!

Please Note That We Are Finishing the Final Creation of The New AllerJeez!

All things allergy, asthma, and eczema.

As the parent of an asthmatic child, I have done countless hours of researching the condition online. I have probably grazed hundreds of medical related websites in doing so. There is plenty of information to be found, but often times the websites include a ton of medical jargon which makes it difficult for an asthma newbie to process the more important information.

Things that make you go “huh”. Can you be “allergic” to electromagnetic radiation? One woman’s story.

A homeowner wants to remove nut trees from his property due to his children’s severe nut allergies. The city will not allow it, stating the removal of the trees would hurt the local eco system. While it would probably be in his best interests to just move to avoid nut trees in surrounding properties, the responses to this short article make my blood boil. There’s so much ignorance and unconcern for the health of the children from the majority of commenters it’s terrifying.

New drug could stop allergic reactions

Posted By Rachel in news, research articles, awareness, controversy | No Comments on July 1st, 2007AllerJeez Blog Carnival : 1st Edition Tracee at BlogFabulous wrote an entertaining and insightful piece about her battles with allergy and how she came to find her Sinus Wash Miracle Cure.

Those with food allergy will obviously want to be mindful of the ingredients of the recipe (contain walnut and coconut), but if your only concern is seasonal allergies and other sinus problems, you probably want to give this a try. The comments of the post contain multiple positive testimonials of the treatment.

Madeleine at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog has written a limerick entitled : Ode to Genetically Altered Cats to give pet allergy sufferers a chuckle.

Clara at Mind Mart discusses some herbal remedy suggestions to help with seasonal allergies.

More 4 Kids’ Kevin posts an article by Dr. Caron Goode on helping your child cope with asthma, featuring breathing exercises you can practice with your children to give them some control when an attack hits.

This concludes our very first blog carnival! I plan on posting a new carnival every Sunday should there be enough interest, I’m very pleased with the response edition 1 has received and hope that everybody keeps the articles coming!

If you’d like to participate again or have just found AllerJeez and want to submit an article for a future edition, you can go here to my page at BlogCarnival.com! Thanks to the authors of Ed.1!

Will My Medifast Diet Impact My Allergic Symptoms?

I've had a few requests for information on this recently. Basically, Medifast is a great dieting cycle of well balanced food proportions shipped to your door. We've seen a lot of various ads on tv regarding other weight loss products but I believe Medifast stands out from the rest.

I have to also mention how one of my friends' son, who has allergies, received a GED on line equivalency by taking a test over the internet and not through a class! Boy the internet cyber education has sure come far when you can take a free test and receive a GED Online all while you sit at home on the couch sipping a mocha! I wish I could have received my diploma that way. Anyway, good work John in getting your GED! It seems that taking a course online to get a high school diploma is where technology is headed. I don't know how reliable the testing process could or would be but I believe this would positively impact the number of teens getting a GED diploma versus dropping out and working at KFC.

The Fungus Among Us: Combating Mold Allergy

It’s well known that some species of mold in homes can make people sick - but when a family member is dealing with an allergy to mold it’s possible that even small amounts of any fungi create a potentially dangerous environment for the individual.

An allergic individual exposed to molds can experience anywhere from mild-moderate allergy symptoms (itchy eyes, sneezing, running nose, sinus infections) to allergic reactions and allergen induced asthma.

Some people are more likely to develop a mold allergy than others, such as those who work in occupations where exposure fungus is common (farming, baking, handiwork, etc)…but that’s a whole other bunch of bananas. Today, we’re talking about mold in your home.

About Household Fungi:

According to an article hosted on Harvard University’s server, it’s guesstimated that about 70% of homes have mold. Areas in and around the home that are most at risk for mold growth include pipes (check for leaks and condensation), plants, firewood stacked by the wood stove or fireplace, basements should really have their own section…but to be brief check for water stains on the walls and ceiling (there could be mold lurking behind it), flooding, and dampness especially where you do your laundering. Take notice that these are not the only places mold can grow, but they are the most common and friendliest environments. Problematic exposure to mold happens when an area of growth has been disturbed, thus releasing its spores (seeds) into the air you breathe.

Preventing Mold Growth:

Complete a walkthrough of your home, and note areas that have been problematic in the past and add them to your fix-it list.. It’s important to find the cause of the growth, and react accordingly, or you will only be temporarily remedying instead of preventing. For those of you who’ve never had a mold problem, observe areas that could potentially become a spore sanctuary. Fungus loves to grow in dark, damp, and undisturbed areas. Move furnishings and large appliances at least an inch away from walls to allow better air circulation. Humidifiers are your new arch enemy. It’s painfully ironic, in a way, since many allergy sufferers also experience stuffy noses and skin conditions like eczema where a humidifier could potentially be helpful. Unfortunately, they also significantly increase the humidity and sometimes temperature (with warm mist units)…and spores that find themselves in this environment will have no qualms with settling in.

Buddy up with the humidifier’s nemeses, the DE-humidifier. It should go without saying that the function of these appliances is the direct opposite of the humidifier. Instead of adding humidity, they extract it from the air. If you live in a humid climate you may want to consider purchasing several units, one for each of the dampest spots in your home: your basement, kitchen, and bathrooms. Use larger units for, you got it, larger rooms. An ideal humidity level is between 40-60%. Air purifiers can be helpful, too. Replace the filters according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Replace filters on furnaces and central AC units every three months. Use mold eradicating cleaners in susceptible areas at least once a month.

Taming Patches as They Appear:

If you are allergic, give the task of treating mold outbreaks to somebody else. An allergic person should never participate in the elimination of mold, no matter how minor of a problem it is. To nuke a small colony, purchase a product that’s formulated to kill the fungus. Wear protective gloves, cover the offending area with the solution, and wipe. Make sure the spot dries thoroughly, and then dispose of the gloves and any sponges or cloths used to clean. If the mold returns, you could be dealing with an issue that needs to be addressed first, like a leak. Consult a plumber or your favorite handyman if you cannot find a source and/or are unable to treat it DIY style.

When the Problem is More Extensive:

First, seriously consider if the problem is something you should take care of without the help of a professional. Before diving in learn a little about stachybotrys and chaetomium, the most dangerous molds. The removal of these types is best left to a professional. Another thing to keep in mind is that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not recommend you try to eradicate mold that covers a space larger than 3 feet by 3 feet.

If you feel confident that you can resolve the problem unaided, in addition to gloves you should wear goggles and one of those stylish particle masks to protect yourself from hazardous exposure. Ventilate your workspace without exposing the rest of your home to spores - seal off heating and air ducts, close doors, and open windows in the contaminated room. Bag and discard all tainted furnishings, knickknacks, appliances, linens, and whatever else. Treat affected areas multiple times (use solution, clean, dry, repeat). Give a good cleaning to all other unaffected surfaces in the area, launder unmoldy linens.

Cell Phones for Kids with Allergies?

I know that it’s going to be hard on me as my daughter grows, becomes more independent, and doesn’t want to be around mommy all of the time anymore. Not only will I need to deal with the normal feelings of separation anxiety that every mother experiences, I have the additional concern of her life threatening allergies.

I'd like to add in how much I like fancy color diamonds. I know this seems off the wall but a woman has the right to enjoy pretty colored stones and diamonds are the best! I have been reviewing possible fancy color diamonds I am interested in buying online and came across Buy Natural Fancy Color Pink Green Blue Diamonds which has an incredible 1.35 carat fancy green diamond! I really like pear cut diamonds and this one is exceptional because it's large and very green! Even though I don't have the cash that this guy is asking, he also has orange and purple fancy colored diamonds too that are more in my range. I think I will try and talk him down on one of the natural pink diamonds if I can reach him.

Is she going to check every food she eats? Take charge and ask questions when she’s not sure? What if she has a reaction? Would she know what to do, and when to do it? I’d imagine the only way to ease some of the worry would be to give her a cell phone. While I realize that a five or six year old with their own cell phone conjures a ridiculous image, a phone would ensure that if anything happens help is only the push of a button away. I do hope that I would have drilled other emergency procedures into her head enough for her to respond effectively in case of one, but sometimes a telephone isn’t readily available.

I think that cell phones could soon be seen as near necessities for children with special needs. They give young children a quick and easy way to place a call to 911, call parents to ask a question about foods or products before using them, and more. What I find exceptionally handy about the phones designed for first time cell phone owners is that they include many unique safety features: the ability to pre-program a small number of phone numbers into your child’s phone, a feature that allows you to restrict incoming and outgoing calls to and from certain numbers, and some of the phones even have GPS tracking so a parent can locate their children at any time.

It's been an amazingly potent year for allergies out here in Scottsdale, Arizona. I have had numerous days of dealing with the sniffles and runny nose and it seems to be in part by the desert acacia trees which bloom and produce "dandelion-like" puff balls that cover the entire trees! These things are everywhere! I have been looking to list my house for sale with my North Scottsdale Real Estate Agent but have been too busy in my house with sniffling to talk real estate or show my condo! Hopefully, when I feel better, I will give Mike Bodeen a call so he can let me know how the Scottsdale real estate marketing is doing and where to price my home at. I have been very pleased in working with him and his team and would recommend any one to use his real estate services.